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Naturopathic digestive support. Decrease heartburn, improved bowel movements, decrease bloating, gas, and pain

I often see cases of heartburn and indigestion in my practice.

Sensations range from a gnawing feeling in the upper-belly to acid burning up into the throat and even out the mouth, scorching the

lips. Heartburn can occur due to a variety of reasons including poor dietary habits, pregnancy, medication use (and abuse), tobacco use, low stomach acid, a hernia, and longstanding health conditions.

Symptoms can creep on you; “I’ve had this for so long”, “I don’t remember when it started, but now everything I eat seems to aggravate it” are what I hear frequently in my office.

Heartburn, acidity, indigestion, and even ulcers are achy (at best) and extremely distressful (at worst).


Here are 5 strategies to help reduce bloating and heartburn:

  1. Diet

Symptoms of heartburn and reflux are commonly triggered by the foods we eat.

Foods that make reflux worse: acidic foods/juices, high fats, red meats, greasy foods, onion and garlic, spicy foods, tomatoes, and peppermint. If you experience heartburn after meals, consider taking these foods OUT of your diet.

  1. Lifestyle

First, posture, posture, posture (while eating)! Maintaining an upright posture helps the food move downwards towards your stomach.

Second, longterm stress may also worsen symptoms of heartburn. Stress puts the body into a state of fight or flight; the opposite is rest and digest. This means that less blood flow is supplied to the digestive system and more supplied to the organs and muscles responsible for dealing with perceived threats. Less blood flow to the digestive system results in the lower esophageal sphincter (connects the esophagus to the stomach) staying open thus allowing for stomach acid to splash up into the esophagus. Re: heartburn.

I like practicing mindful eating techniques. Enjoying my meals when I’m the least distracted (stressed) in order to ensure that my food is digested and nothing splashes back up. To learn more, check out my tips for mindful eating.

  1. Chronic NSAID use

NSAIDs are often used as a tool to help decrease pain and inflammation in the body. Unfortunately one of the side effects includes the erosion of the mucosal lining (protective layer) of the digestive tract; less protection = more injury from acid and digestive juices.

Luckily, there are plenty of alternative options for managing pain and inflammation that spare the mucosal lining; I often recommend options to patients who are looking for healthier solutions to managing their pain. (More on this soon, but my favourite go-to is acupuncture!)

  1. Eliminate alcohol and coffee

These substances relax the tone of the LES and increasing the production of stomach acid. This can worsen symptoms of heartburn and reflux.

  1. Avoid eating 2-3 hours before bed

This goes hand-in-hand with maintaining an upright posture while eating. Waiting a couple of hours between your last meal and bedtime ensures that your meal has been digested and nothing is left behind triggering the production of stomach acid. (And of course, that nothing splashes back up!)

 

So there you have it! 5 easy strategies for decreasing the burning feeling after meals.

Tested these techniques out and looking for more individualized solutions? Book in with me and find out how naturopathic improve your symptoms and prevent heartburn from “splashing up” again!



Mindful eating habits for health

Retraining the mind to respond to the body’s hunger cues may seem like a daunting task, but actually begins with a few easy steps! Mindfulness-based eating techniques aid with managing and treating emotional eating, weight gain/loss, support energy and overall health.

Here are 6 tips to try today!

  1. Have an attitude of gratitude: Give thanks before each mealPracticing gratitude for food before consuming them is a technique to eat more mindfully.
  2. Be seated: sit in a comfortable position at a table
  3. Chew 30 times: (an arbitrary number) mindful chewing sends messages to the brain that the body is refuelling and well soon be full.
  4. No screens: Power down distractions during meals to fully focus on consuming your meal
  5. Portion food: Measure foods according to guides with reference to your goals and use smaller plates (to visually see that you are indeed consuming a plate-full of delicious food)Portion control helps cut calories and prevent overeating, in order to lose weight. A handful of berries is an excellent source of antioxidants.
  6. Stop when full: Don’t polish off plates, listen to hunger cues. Your body will start to naturally tell you when it doesn’t feel hungry anymore – it might start off as a whisper, listen to it!

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Fats.

Here’s the skinny, fats are good for you!  Our bodies are designed to store fat for a multitude of purposes. Vitamins such as A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble and that means that they can only be absorbed and stored in the body in- that’s right you guessed it – fats! Did you know that the human brain is 60% fat? Essential fatty acids promote healthy development of the nervous system in children and as well deter cognitive impairment in the elderly. Fats are the main component of cell membranes and are even an essential part of hormones.

But wont eating fats make me fat? Negative! It’s the type of fat that counts- check out some of these healthy fats to incorporate into your diet for your optimal and vital being:

  • Olive oil. Opt for cold-pressed. Olive oil makes a delicious substitute for store-bought/processed salad dressings. Additionally, studies have demonstrated the benefits of the Mediterranean diet and olive oil consumption for decreasing the risk of adverse cardiac events.
  • This delicious fruit contains MUFAs (mono-unsaturated fatty acids) and are associated with overall increased quality of diet and a decreased risk of metabolic syndrome.
  • My personal favourite are walnuts. These guys are rich in phytochemicals and PUFAs (poly-unsaturated fatty acids); the high amounts of polyphenolic compounds are a great source of antioxidants for the brain by helping to decrease inflammation and improve firing of nerve cells. Ever wonder how walnuts resemble brains?
  • Coconut oil. Probably the most versatile and accessible oil out there, the compounds in coconut oil help to decrease inflammation in the body. This oil is great for stir-fry dishes and even helps with dryness when applied to the skin directly.

What to avoid:

  • Deep-fried foods, processed foods, and saturated fats. These bad boys are a no-no!

The take home message today: don’t be afraid of fats! Aim for healthy nut butters to add to your morning power smoothies, avocados are tasty additions to salad that help fill you up,

and fatty fish such as salmon are light on the waistline but heavy on the nutrients. Healthy fats promote whole wellbeing. It’s a marathon friends, I encourage you to make the better choices today – your body will thank you tomorrow!

Sources:

Dalen, J., & Devries, S. (n.d.). Diets to Prevent Coronary Heart Disease 1957- 2013: What Have We Learned? The American Journal of Medicine.

Fulgoni, V., Dreher, M., & Davenport, A. (n.d.). Avocado consumption is associated with better diet quality and nutrient intake, and lower metabolic syndrome risk in US adults: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001–2008. Nutrition Journal, 1-1.

Poulose, S., Miller, M., & Shukitt-Hale, B. (n.d.). Role of Walnuts in Maintaining Brain Health with Age. Journal of Nutrition, 561S-566S.


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